Feb 292012
 

leadership, clear expectations, trust, communication, Vision, Mission, Culture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Studies have shown that trust and confidence in top leadership is the single most reliable predictor of employee satisfaction in an organization.

Effective communication by leadership in three critical areas is the key to winning organizational trust and confidence, and involves:

3 Critical areas of communication:

  • 1.  Helping employees understand the company’s overall Vision.
  • 2.  Helping employees understand how they contribute to achieving this Vision.
  • 3.  Sharing information with employees on both how the company is doing and how an employee’s own division    or    department is doing – relative to the company’s Vision.

To build your dream team you must be trustworthy and you have to be able to communicate your vision of where you are going.  At my company we do this with our Vision, Mission, and Culture document. It is a document that we created to communicate our company’s expectations. We communicate the VMC and these expectations during our interview process and throughout the relationship that our company has with its team members.

Do you have a VMC? If not, what do you use to communicate your expectations to new team members?

Do you want to create a VMC? See below for some quick points to get you started.

  • Create of Vision that speaks to the next 15 -20 years.
  • The Vision is the “what” and the Mission Statement is the “How” your going to achieve your vision.
  • Break your culture up into 4 key areas of expectations. 1. Your expectations as the leader. 2. Your customers expectations. 3. Your employees expectations. 4. The expectations of your business as a whole.

 

If you enjoyed this post, I would be grateful if you helped spread the word by emailing it to a friend or sharing it on LinkedIn, Twitter, or Facebook. Thank you!

 February 29, 2012  Posted by at 6:00 AM Leadership Tagged with: , ,  4 Responses »
Feb 272012
 

Business planning, Business coaching, Branding, small business strategies, clear expections

 

Below you will see a list of words or phrases that “WE” use at my SERVICE business to help communicate. Read it, print it out, post them in your office, and use them. They work.

 

 Powerful Phrases:

 

Powerful Words:

  • The six most important words: ” I admit I made a mistake.”
  • The five most important words: ” You did a good job.”
  • The four most important words: ” What is your opinion?”
  • The three most important words: “If you please.”
  • The two most important words: “Thank you,”
  • The one most important word: “We”
  • The least important word: “I”

 

How many of these are you already using? Do you have anymore that use in your business or in your daily life? If so, please share below in the comments section. Help everyone learn to communicate better in their lives.

If you enjoyed this post, I would be grateful if you helped spread the word by emailing it to a friend or sharing it on LinkedIn, Twitter, or Facebook. Thank you!

 February 27, 2012  Posted by at 6:00 AM Leadership, Team Tagged with: , , ,  5 Responses »
Feb 232012
 

Branding, Business Coaching, Service Businesses, Build a Better business, Business Planning

 

Sometimes we let our personalities shine through just a little too much. Maintaining a professional image is the key to making sure our Personal Branding strategy doesn’t turn out to be a train wreck like “Donald’s”.

3 things to remember when developing a Personal Branding Strategy.

1. Your values, your personality, and the things you care about are the factors that drive your decision on what your personal brand is.

2.  What drives your decision on what your personal brand is, is how you need people to perceive you in order to reach your income and growth goals.

3. Your Personal Brand should explain who you are and what you do in a clear and professional manner. Referring back to the picture above. Clear yes. Professional, not so much.

Do you want to learn more about Personal Branding? Take a look at this great book.

 

If you enjoyed this post, I would be very grateful if you helped spread the word by emailing it to a friend or sharing it on LinkedIn, Twitter, or Facebook. Thank you!

 

 

 February 23, 2012  Posted by at 6:00 AM Growth Tagged with: ,  3 Responses »
Feb 222012
 

E-myth, Passive Income, systems, building business, service coach, business coaching

Part 2: Working ON your business not IN your business. – How to become the Entrepreneur you were meant to be.

In Part 1 we defined the 3 Roles/Personalities of a business owner. Below you will see those definitions again, but with some ideas on how to move yourself and your leadership skills up the ladder.

1. The Technician.

The Technician is the doer. With this role your primary responsibilities are the technical part of the business. If you own a plumbing business the technician is the plumber.

How to transition from technician to manager.

  • The first step to managing an employee is to first learn the trade or skill by doing it yourself.
  • Document everything you do into owners manuals and check lists.
  • Develop a recruiting, hiring, and training program that works for your technicians.

2. The Manager.

The Manager lives in the past, the manager craves order. The manager builds a house then lives in it forever. The entrepreneur Continue reading »

 February 22, 2012  Posted by at 6:00 AM Growth, Leadership Tagged with: , ,  No Responses »
Feb 212012
 
Business planning, Business coaching, Branding, small business strategies

Some rights reserved by stevendepolo

1. Specific

Yes, your goals must be specific. I am going to succeed in 2012 is not specific enough. I am going to increase revenue by 15% that’s a specific goal. And that is my goal at The Window Brothers for 2012.

2. Measurable

Your goal must be measurable. It doesn’t have to be monetary, but it does have to be measurable. We are going to be the best XYZ company in 2012, is not measurable. First you need to define “best”. Then, how are you measuring it?

3. Achievable

This is the one that I always have to remind myself about. When writing down my SMART goals I seem to do pretty well with the other categories. However, this category is the one that I always seem to underestimate. No Jason, doubling your revenue in one year is not achievable. It’s ok to dream big, in fact I encourage it. Doubling your revenue is a great goal. But doing it in 5 years is probably more healthy and more achievable than doing it in one year.

4. Results Orientated

This one is very similar to # 2. Make sure your goals are measurable and results orientated. Make sure they are focused on you and your company getting something done. Getting results is what setting goals is all about. It is call a business not a “busy-ness.”

5. Time frame

Assign an achievable time frame to all of your goals. How long is it going take you to achieve your X,Y, & Z goals? A goal not written down is just a wish. Write your goals down and stake it in the ground by setting a time frame to it.

What are your goals for 2012?

How did you do on your 2011 goals? If the answer to the question is “not so great”, then you need to ask yourself. Did I write my goals down? Were they SMART? Do you have someone holding you accountable for achieving these goals?

 

If you enjoyed this post, I would be very grateful if you helped spread the word by emailing it to a friend or sharing it on LinkedIn, Twitter, or Facebook. Thank you!

 February 21, 2012  Posted by at 6:00 AM Growth, Leadership Tagged with: ,  6 Responses »
Feb 202012
 
team, key performance indicators, leadership, hiring employees, building a better business

All rights reserved by Elaf417

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Part 1 we learned about DISC profiles and how using personality profiles can help to measure a candidate’s qualities before they are hired. I discussed how I use DISC and VAK to help make the right match of person and position.

Today I would like to discuss the last 2 most common errors that occur. They are inadequate training/evaluation, and a lack of leadership. Now, let’s take a look at those issues in greater detail.

 

2. The problem could be that your training, measuring, and evaluation process is inadequate.

When was the last time you revised your orientation process? Your company handbook? The initial process for training a new hire? What KPI’s (key performance indicators) are they held accountable for? How often do they receive feedback? Who mentors the new employees and for how long? I recommend that all employees participate in the regular team meeting (what do you mean “I don’t have one”) and are asked at each one: What can we do to help you succeed in your job? A few years ago, I heard of a “training method” referred to as “Leave alone, zap”. This means that the new hire is, in effect, turned loose to figure things out and then “zapped” when they make a mistake. This, or any similar approach, basically sets someone up to fail. As expensive as staff turnover is (time, repeated re-training, lost productivity, etc), it is certainly worth investing in refining the process so that we do a better job and “start over” less often.

 

3. The Leader doesn’t know what he/she is doing, so neither does the Team.

In order to have great followers, there has to be a great leader. No team will ever out-perform its leadership. Are you the kind of leader that a great employee would want to follow? Are you running the kind of business that a great employee would want to work for? I can assure you, the team watches everything you do and dissects everything you say. Start with your communication—do you communicate clearly and regularly? Are you consistent in your statements and behavior? Do you do what you say you will do? Also, if you “waffle” or delay making decisions, you are viewed as weak and indecisive. If you have the courage, survey the Team about their views of you as the Leader and be willing to “sharpen your saw” to make some changes. Change your outlook, change your results!

If you enjoyed this post, I would be very grateful if you helped spread the word by emailing it to a friend or sharing it on LinkedIn, Twitter, or Facebook. Thank you!

 February 20, 2012  Posted by at 6:00 AM Leadership, Team Tagged with: , ,  2 Responses »
Feb 162012
 

 

distractions, facebook, focus, business not busyness, technology,addicted to distractions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What do all these communication tools have in common?

  • Emails
  • Facebook
  • Phone calls
  • Text messages
  • LinkedIn/Facebook notifications
  • Monthly newsletters

They are all distractions. The truth is, maybe you are addicted to distractions just like I am. I love to see that email preview that pops up in the bottom corner of my computer screen when a new email has arrived in my inbox. Sure I could turn off this preview feature, but I like it. I like the interruption. Let’s face it these types of distractions are just more exciting that then a lot of our day-to-day activities.

Yes, of course we need the technology that these communication tools provide us in order to run our businesses. However, in the end they are all distractions from whatever task we are currently working on. As business owners we have a lot of tasks that we could be working on. Making sure to schedule time for emails, phone calls, or social media in your day will allow you to focus on your daily tasks without as many distractions. It’s not hocus pocus, it’s about focus.

Remember it is called a business not a busyness. What are your favorite distractions? Are you in control of your day or do your distractions control you?

If you enjoyed this post, I would be very grateful if you helped spread the word by emailing it to a friend or sharing it on LinkedIn, Twitter, or Facebook. Thank you!

 

 

 

 February 16, 2012  Posted by at 6:00 AM Time Tagged with: ,  No Responses »
Feb 152012
 

entrepreneur, manager, technician, leadership, business coaching,

Part 1: Working ON your business not IN your business. – How to calm the Chaos and get your life back.

In order to understand How to work ON your business not IN your business we first need to define the 3 main roles that any business owner has within their business. 3 Roles/Personalities of a Business Owner:

1. The Technician. The Technician is the doer. With this role your primary responsibilities are the technical part of the business. If you own a plumbing business the technician is the plumber.

2. The Manager. The Manager lives in the past, the manager craves order. The manager builds a house then lives in it forever. The entrepreneur builds a house and the instant it is done starts planning the next one.

3.  The Entrepreneur. The Entrepreneur is the visionary or the dreamer in us. The entrepreneur lives in the future, never in the past, rarely in the present.  To the entrepreneur, most people are problems that get in the way of the dream. Where the entrepreneur lives in the future, the manager lives in the past, the technician lives in the present. The entrepreneur is always creating new and interesting work for the technician to do, thus establishing a potentially symbiotic relationship. Are you interested in learning how to move through the different levels of entrepreneurialism? Watch for our follow-up post that will discuss ways to transition your role in your business. Getting you out of the day-to-day and into the Entrepreneur stage.

 February 15, 2012  Posted by at 6:00 AM Growth, Leadership Tagged with: ,  No Responses »
Feb 142012
 

Let me first say that this book is classified as an easy read. If you don’t really like to read then you won’t have a problem with this book. It is a total of 130 pages dripping wet. Also, the majority of the book is in story format which makes it very easy to follow.

Are you a crazy business owner who works long hours, hard hours, yet never quite seems to get caught up with all the work you have to do? If you are someone who feels overwhelmed with problems created by other people, this book will change your life. The author Ken Blanchard breaks down the delegation process in 4 rules or steps.

4 rules of Monkey Management

Rule 1. Describe the Monkey(problem).

The dialogue must not end until appropriate “next moves” have been identified and specified. Make sure it is clear between you and your staff on what the “monkey” or problem is.

Rule 2. Assign the Monkey.

All monkeys shall be owned and delegated to the person responsible for the that task.

Rule 3. Insure the Monkey.

Every monkey leaving your presence on the back of one of your people must be covered by one of  two insurance policies: 1. Recommend, Then Act. 2. Act, Then Advise.

Rule 4. Check on the Monkey.

Proper follow-up means healthier monkeys. Every monkey should have a checkup appointment.

Are you interested in learning more about delegation and these 4 rules of “Monkey” management? Then this book could very well help you get your time, life, and business back. Remember, the purpose of your business is to provide you with the life that YOU want. You do not work for your business, your business works for you. Grab it here.The One Minute Manager

 

 February 14, 2012  Posted by at 6:00 AM Time Tagged with: , ,  No Responses »
Feb 132012
 
hiring, team building, job descriptions, DISC profile, personality testing

Some rights reserved by Jiheffe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you think you can’t get great employees? Can’t get them to do what you need? Can’t get them to stay?  Start by taking a look in the mirror. Before you blame your Team, remember that old adage: “You get the employees you deserve.”  The most common errors that occur are hiring the wrong person, inadequate training/evaluation, and finally, a lack of leadership. Now, let’s take a look at those issues in greater detail.

1. You’re hiring the wrong person or putting them in the wrong place.

Using personality profiles can help to measure a candidate’s qualities before they are hired. I use DISC and VAK to help make the right match of person and position.

The DISC profile measures a person’s natural (away from work) and adapted (at work) behavioral tendencies. The profile takes about 10 minutes and yields some very useful tips on individual strengths, opportunities for improvement, and keys to motivating.

The VAK (stands for visual, auditory, and kinesthetic) measures communication modalities. In addition, examine the hiring process and the questions that are being asked. What do you need to change based on the lessons you’ve learned in the past? Ask questions that uncover values and look for alignment with your company’s values. I have found that a “bad employee” is rarely due to the lack of job competence—it’s more often a failure to mesh with organizational values. You must hire character because that can’t be taught. An employee with a great “values match” will still underperform if you assign them to the wrong job. Go back through your job descriptions and modify for what the business needs, then hire the person that fits that description. Chaos results when you change the job to match the skill set of the newest hire.

Below you will see the definitions of each of the 4 types of personalities within the DISC profile system. As you read through them think about anyone you may know that fits into each profile. Then write their name next to the particular profile.  Then ask yourself, are they are performing the correct tasks for their personality?

“D” Style(Direct):
Adventuresome
Competitive
Daring
Decisive
Direct
Innovative
Persistent
Problem Solver
Results-Orientated

“I” Style(Inspiring):
Charming
Confident
Convincing
Enthusiastic
Inspiring
Optimistic
Persuasive
Popular
Sociable
Precise
Team Player
“S” Style(Steady):
Amiable
Friendly
Good Listener
Patient
Self-starter
Relaxed
Sincere
Stable
Steady
“C” Style(Consistent)
Accurate
Analytical
Conscientious
Diplomatic
Trusting
Fact-Finder
High Standards
Mature
Patient

Do you want to learn more about using DISC profiles? I use them in all my businesses and love teaching other business owners how to use them. To apply to our coaching program. Click here.

Watch for our follow-up article “Are you hiring the wrong people?” Part 2. Where we will be discussing inadequate training/evaluation, and finally, a lack of leadership. These are the final 2 common errors that business owners make when building their teams.

 

 February 13, 2012  Posted by at 6:00 AM Team Tagged with: ,  No Responses »